Book Review: Beyond Training

I’ve been reading more lately, delving into the world of nonfiction. And boy, what a dive it was…

Beyond Training by Ben Greenfield was a hell of a trip, a good one at that. The book was well worth the read, and I’ll share the details of my experience below.

Premise

The book starts fast and hits hard. The author covers everything from weight lifting, athletic programs, nutrition, detox, lifestyle hacking, even spiritual science, yoga, and meditation. There’s a lot here, and I was initially overwhelmed at the depth Greenfield goes into. Some of the material I skipped over, but most of it was helpful and easily applied to my own life.

The book is catered to athletes and weightlifters, but most of the information can be applied to anyone, even those seeking to optimize their IQ.

Length

The book is bulky, clocking in at around 500 pages. Each chapter contains subsections for the sake of organization. Thanks to this, I never got truly lost throughout the book. Greenfield keeps the text simple and to the point, but he also included sciencey bits for us nerds.

Information

As mentioned above, Greenfield’s chapters focus on athletes and weightlifters. Things like eating a clean, wholefood diet, living ancestrally, squatting, staying organized and in the moments—these are a few of the things he covers, and so much more. I even picked up parenting tips and advice on biohacking technology.

For this reason, not everything in the book will cater to a specific reader. Instead, the book should be read as a reference guide, with certain sections skimmed if needed. That’s what I did, and I still got a lot out of the book.

Greenfield begins with chapters on fitness, training secrets, and recovery protocols. He then branches out to lifestyle and nutrition, hormone balancing with habits like cold showers, saunas. Greenfield ends with a chapter on optimizing the brain and IQ.

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The Good

Beyond Training is a worthwhile read for anyone, with its plethora of tips about getting the most out of life. A reader can take what resonates and apply it, reaping the rewards.

The Bad

The book’s strength is also its flaw. Information overload is rampant in Beyond Training, and this might turn off some readers. Other sections are tougher to read with science jargon thrown in.

The Ugly

Some of the lifestyle tips border on either unfeasible or unaffordable. For most people, a $700 Earthpulse isn’t a likely purchase. Granted, I haven’t tried this technology myself, so it may be worth the investment. But that’s the thing: investing in one’s health is a journey, involving pitfalls, rewards, pain and suffering, joy and surrender.

Beyond Training is a fantastic read, though it may appear daunting at first. It can apply to a wide niche of readers, and due to its organized sections and chapters, a reader can find what he or she needs with ease. I will certainly reread it over the coming years—and I encourage you, dear reader, to do the same.


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Aspectä rey’lief, fair reader, and thanks for reading!
—Ed R. White

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