Book Review: Divine Summons

During my break from non-fiction research, I stumbled upon this jewel on Goodreads. I was impressed by the strength of the prose and the story. Rebecca P. Minor did a pleasant job at it. Let’s delve into the details, shall we?

Premise & Worldbuilding

Divine Summons has a classic fantasy atmosphere with elves, dragons, monsters, and magic. I’m a sucker for fantasy tropes, and the immersion had me sold within the first chapter. Traveling between elven cities, ancient caverns, and dark forests, the story never turned stagnant. There’s plenty of lore that kept me intrigued, not to mention the splendid battle scenes and dialog.

Characters

Taken from a (mostly) first-person POV, the story conveys excellent character emotion, dialog, and prose flow. The cast of characters provided conflict, worldbuilding, and comic relief details. One issue was the shifting from first-person to third-person POV throughout the story. Most readers would gawk at this—and I certainly did—but I overlooked it in favor of a story that held me fast.

Magic System

A soft magic system governs this story, with whimsical, flashy outcomes and unspoken costs. The god, Creo, governs the faith-based school of magic in this story. Albeit, the magic performed some ex deus machina in some scenes, which came off as unsatisfying for me. The author could have worked the magic better into the conflict and story, rather than have it as a lever to fix plot or character-conflict issues.

Conflict

Tension and pacing were solid, despite the subpar execution of the magic system. The characters found themselves in plenty of horrid situations. The expositions and inner struggles were well done, and complemented the strong cast of characters. Immersion had me turning pages, particularly the fight scenes, which were excellent. Battles were endowed with plenty of details, but never too many to make them cumbersome.

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The Good

The characters, pacing, tension, and immersion painted an addictive story. Details on lore and worldbuilding enhanced this, providing an enjoyable read from start to finish except for a few scenes. Battle chapters were excellent.

The Bad

The shift between first-person and third-person POVs felt jarring and marginalized the main character. Some of these third-person POVs were somewhat unnecessary, congesting the pacing and story with minor details. The magic system came off as a prop to save the main character at worst, and a flashy addition at best.

The Ugly

The story had a few graphic scenes, but that was it.

Divine Summons was enjoyable, despite its shortcomings in its magic system and POVs. The rich worldbuilding had me hooked, and the sword fights and dialog scenes were pleasant. I’ve already started on the second book, and it reads stronger than the first, so I am hopeful. For any fantasy lovers, Rebecca A Minor has a great series that’s sure to delight readers who can overlook its blemishes.


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Aspectä rey’lief, fair reader, and thanks for reading!
—Ed R. White

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Book Review: Sword of Fire

After finishing a long beta read and dealing with more hours at work, I’m ready to get back to blogging. In the meanwhile, I finished another fantasy book. The Sword of Fire by Katherine Kerr was an interesting read.

Premise

The story of Deverry is a generic fantasy with dwarves, elves, dragons, and humans. Here’s where it gets interesting. Politics plays heavily into the plot, and even the overall feel of Deverry. Several scenes take place in royal courts, towns, and conferences where lengthily dialog ensues. The dialog was excellent, and the character cues spot-on.

Length

At around 350 pages, the story wasn’t a boor to read. Chapters and scenes were well organized. The author also included a bonus short story at the end, explaining more of Deverry and its characters.

Characters

Many of the characters are politically motivated. Corrupt laws and loopholes riddle the land of Deverry, and aristocrats are often at war. One of the protagonists, a young law student (if those could exist in medieval fantasies; they’re known as bards here) goes on an adventure with sellswords to save the kingdom from the corruption. Other characters serve as nobility PoV perspectives.

Overall, the characters began shallow and dull, but they grew on me later on. Katherine Kerr has a unique way in how she bonds characters to the reader; subtle at first, but heavily towards the end.

Magic System

Dwimmer (sorry if I butchered that) is the soft magic system in Deverry. It isn’t seen much, but when it is, intriguing results ensue. Mind reading, telepathy, telekinesis, and elemental manipulation are some of the abilities used. Nonetheless, it didn’t contribute much to the story. Moreso, it felt like it was there for the sake of the genre: a fantasy.

Conflict

The tension and pacing were slow and gradual. There weren’t many jarring scenes; even the more brutal ones were mediocre; though there was one scene that struck me. The ramp in tension towards the end of the book was, at best, underwhelming.

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The Good

The Sword of Fire has charming characters, a unique premise in Deverry—mixing fantasy with political intrigue—and good throwbacks to history. The Silver Dagger faction, a clan of dishonored mercenaries, was fun to read about and played well into several character arcs.

The Bad

The magic system, while interesting, did little to enhance the story or characters. In fact, the plot could have done without it. Tension was underwhelming and poorly executed into prose.

The Ugly

Some of the old English terms seemed amusing and sometimes awkward. I wasn’t particularly a fan of their usage, but they still established a nice “historical fiction worldbuilding” feel.

The story of Deverry was decent. With its premise, characters, and political issues, The Sword of Fire offered much potential for its worldbuilding and story arcs. Despite this, poor tension, pacing, and an awkwardly executed magic system made the read tedious at times. I enjoyed it, but won’t be reading the sequel.


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Aspectä rey’lief, fair reader, and thanks for reading!
—Ed R. White

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Book Review: Beyond Training

I’ve been reading more lately, delving into the world of nonfiction. And boy, what a dive it was…

Beyond Training by Ben Greenfield was a hell of a trip, a good one at that. The book was well worth the read, and I’ll share the details of my experience below.

Premise

The book starts fast and hits hard. The author covers everything from weight lifting, athletic programs, nutrition, detox, lifestyle hacking, even spiritual science, yoga, and meditation. There’s a lot here, and I was initially overwhelmed at the depth Greenfield goes into. Some of the material I skipped over, but most of it was helpful and easily applied to my own life.

The book is catered to athletes and weightlifters, but most of the information can be applied to anyone, even those seeking to optimize their IQ.

Length

The book is bulky, clocking in at around 500 pages. Each chapter contains subsections for the sake of organization. Thanks to this, I never got truly lost throughout the book. Greenfield keeps the text simple and to the point, but he also included sciencey bits for us nerds.

Information

As mentioned above, Greenfield’s chapters focus on athletes and weightlifters. Things like eating a clean, wholefood diet, living ancestrally, squatting, staying organized and in the moments—these are a few of the things he covers, and so much more. I even picked up parenting tips and advice on biohacking technology.

For this reason, not everything in the book will cater to a specific reader. Instead, the book should be read as a reference guide, with certain sections skimmed if needed. That’s what I did, and I still got a lot out of the book.

Greenfield begins with chapters on fitness, training secrets, and recovery protocols. He then branches out to lifestyle and nutrition, hormone balancing with habits like cold showers, saunas. Greenfield ends with a chapter on optimizing the brain and IQ.

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The Good

Beyond Training is a worthwhile read for anyone, with its plethora of tips about getting the most out of life. A reader can take what resonates and apply it, reaping the rewards.

The Bad

The book’s strength is also its flaw. Information overload is rampant in Beyond Training, and this might turn off some readers. Other sections are tougher to read with science jargon thrown in.

The Ugly

Some of the lifestyle tips border on either unfeasible or unaffordable. For most people, a $700 Earthpulse isn’t a likely purchase. Granted, I haven’t tried this technology myself, so it may be worth the investment. But that’s the thing: investing in one’s health is a journey, involving pitfalls, rewards, pain and suffering, joy and surrender.

Beyond Training is a fantastic read, though it may appear daunting at first. It can apply to a wide niche of readers, and due to its organized sections and chapters, a reader can find what he or she needs with ease. I will certainly reread it over the coming years—and I encourage you, dear reader, to do the same.


Interested in joining my mailing list? Members will receive free poetry, special deals, messages to inspire and empower your life, and short stories. You’ll also get the latest news on projects.
Aspectä rey’lief, fair reader, and thanks for reading!
—Ed R. White

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December 2020: News and Personal Reflections

We live in tough times, between geopolitical events and the Coronavirus. It can be hard pushing through life. I’ve been there. The only things that pulled me from the brink of depression these past several months have been my creative world-building, meditation, and health-seeking journey.

We Were Designed to Progress.

Every human being has the potential to thrive and survive in this world. We fall to the depths of despair, so we can rise to heights of unconditional love. Remember what it is that brings you joy, to seek the lightless light of Truth.

For me, it was my fictional daughter, Pepper Slyhart. Pepper suffers through the Hero’s Journey, allowing her to rise above the vicissitudes of life. It is this adventure of the hero that is inside every one of us.

The Creative Journey

Creative writing is a ritual that many of us take for granted. We get stuck or we procrastinate. But there are methods to combat this mental block.

Writing is a journey of humanity itself. See this book review I did on David Hawkins book to see what I mean. Transcending the Levels of Consciousness certainly opened my eyes to the truth about reality. About life. Needless to say, it’s improved my writing ambition.

Languages and Music

Writing a high fantasy novel gets trickier when you delve into fantasy languages. Here’s a post on developing a fantasy language, with a portion on the one I invented: the Primeal.

That said, the creative process is daunting. Remaining in a relaxed state during our lives is essential to our well being. This is demonstrated in Blade of Dragons through a process called terraum. I’ve listened to Biotropic music lately to ease me into that meditative state. Give it a listen. You won’t be disappointed.

Books Read

I finished a handful of delightful books this past month. Of mention, one was an urban fantasy called The Wild Hunt by Ron Nieto. It’s a curious book about fay in modern society and the magical adventures of a young teen rescuing her grandmother. Another book was nonfiction on the practical uses of Real Alchemy by Robert Bartlett, which will likely receive a book review soon.

Final Notes

Life as an artist, spiritual seeker, and naturopath isn’t easy. It is with help from readers like you that make it possible. Thank you for your time and attention. I hope these stories inspire you to new heights, helping you to progress, to seek the Truth within us.


Interested in joining my mailing list? Members will receive free poetry, special deals, messages to inspire and empower your life, and short stories. You’ll also get the latest news on projects.
Aspectä rey’lief, fair reader, thanks for reading.
—Ed R. White

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Book Review and Spiritual Reflections: David Hawkins, Transcending the Levels of Consciousness

When it comes to writing, few authors consider the spiritual implications involved. Writing is, in truth, more than an art. It is a path to the soul.

A type of meditation.

In my journey to understand my own spiritual journey, I sought a book that resonated with me. You see, each book carries with it markings of its author. Leftover vibes, if you will. Books are like a preview in the author’s soul—but that’s a topic for another time.

Enter David R Hawkins.

He does a superb job describing the matter of the soul. The Hero’s Journey, which I stress again and again, is the crux of not only storytelling, but of humanity itself.

Premise

David Hawking’s book is filled with information on the psyche among other spiritual essays. Hawkins explains his scale of consciousness.

The chapters are well organized and filled with tips on improving one’s personal life. I always get a thrill progressing from page to page, like the vibes from the author are filling me with wisdom and insight.

Most of the information he shares is heavy-duty, so don’t expect a light read from this author. Hawkins doesn’t pull punches when describing the issues with humanity. Some readers may be discouraged by this attitude.

Length

The book is quite long at over 400 pages. The beginning and end of the book include generalized essays on human consciousness. Chapters on the individual states fill in the rest.

Information

The chapters spell out the states of the human condition, starting with shame and guilt. Hawkins’ information begins more concrete, but becomes abstract as he discusses the upper states of peace and enlightenment.

He also mentions a form of divination called muscle testing. The practitioner says a statement, and if it is false, the muscles in the body go weak. For the experienced, this can be (theoretically) a useful method to discern truth.

I’ve read the book three times over the past couple years; each read, I discover new insights. Depending on the reader’s own state of mind, s/he may pick up different impressions.

The Good

David Hawkins’ book is a pleasure to read for any spiritual seeker or the curious. It also provides excellent information on human emotion and how to better understand it from a creative writers’ perspective.

The Bad

Much of the book reads on a college+ level, and many of the ideas are abstract. The average reader may feel overwhelmed upon a first read.

The Ugly

Not so much ugly as deep and hard-hitting, Transcending the Levels of Consciousness digs deep into the human condition. It spares no mercy spelling out human issues and the implications behind them.

Despite its high reading level and abstract concepts, I found this book magnificent. It speaks to me like few books ever could. I plan to read more of Hawkins’ works in the future—and I encourage you, dear reader, to check it out too.

Writers and artists often focus too much on the craft itself, instead of the spiritual beauty behind it. Each piece is a measure of the author; a window into the soul. Perhaps by understanding these simple concepts suggested by Hawkins, we may unravel new depths to our writing and creative abilities.


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With much love and gratitude, fair reader, thanks for reading.
—Ed R. White

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Book Review: The Enduring Flame Trilogy

Hello, my readers, I hope you’re all doing fine during the Quarantine. I finished a fantasy series a while ago, and wanted to do a review while it was still fresh in my mind.

I did a review of the first book here. While I enjoyed the first installation very much, the rest of the series was disappointing. I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum.

Anyway, let’s dive in!

Premise

The first book of the Enduring Flame series started strong. There was plenty of worldbuilding, two heroes called on a wild adventure, whimsical magic, and horrible dangers lurking everywhere.

While the second book did a decent job elaborating on the first book, the third installation fell short. Resorting to mundane storytelling and cliche fantasy tropes, the book ruined everything that the first two books has built up.

By the end of the story, I was ready to shelf the book and forget about the series entirely.

Length

Each book is around 400 pages. Chapters can be long, but are broken down with several scene breaks that alternate between character perspectives. Personally, I enjoyed the many scene breaks, as it makes it convenient for taking breaks or stopping for the day.

Characters

The two main protagonists, Harrier and Tiercel, had a degree of charm. They acted as if they were siblings, always arguing in an amusing way. The third heroine, Shaiara, I found the most interesting, however, as her worldview is vastly different. This contrast in character perspectives added color to the worldbuilding and is one good thing that the series maintained.

Magic System

The magic is whimsical and unpredictable. This offered many fascinating scenarios throughout the book, but also created a variety of plot holes and asspulls from characters that seemed contrived. Overall, the magic system damaged the story by the end of the third book.

Conflict

The tension was steady and drove the prose well through the first two books. In the third book, the conflict became dull and tedious, though there still was an element of danger and risk.

The Good

The Enduring Flame Trilogy has excellent worldbuilding early on and sets strong tension with its initial installations. The characters are amusing and likable. Character’s magic is powerful and can lead to some jaw-dropping scenes, some which had me quivering with excitement. The antagonist has good backstory, weaving into the magical system.

The Bad

The prose is filled with excessive adverbs, fair dialog, mediocre characterisation, and a story that decays by the end of the third book. The magic system led to several plot holes and contrived scenarios that almost made me want to put the book down.

The Ugly

All three books have a lot of mundane “travel time” and inappropriate detours that take from the direction of the plot without adding to subplots or character growth. The main characters, while relatable, are sometimes snobbish or stupid—and not in a likable way.

The Enduring Flame series is a flower that wilted early in the season. Many of its fans from the first two books will be disappointed with the conclusion. All in all, the trilogy is nothing noteworthy, nor is it a piece of garbage that should never have been published. There are a few pearls within its pages, for those willing to look deep into the quest of Harrier and Tiercel.

Thank you for reading!


I’m playing around with some new designs with my blog and testing them out. I’m also merging my blog with Mailchimp (still in testing). I plan to send out blog news and free gifts once I get it up and running! 🙂

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Book Review: The Phoenix Unchained

 

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Hello and welcome to my latest book review. It’s been a busy month between family, work, and NaNo; that doesn’t mean I can’t offer another informative review from yours truly.

A writer friend recommended this series to me, and I decided it give it a go. Needless to say, I enjoyed the read and plan to read the following books at some point.

—The Phoenix Unchained—

Premise

The Phoenix Unchained is an immersive story with a rich amount of lore and enjoyable cast of characters. Book one includes staple mythology like dragons, goblins, mages, and unicorns. What I found most interesting was the magic system and how it weaves into the character arcs—but more on that below.

Length

The book is around 380 pages. Chapters can be long, but are broken down with several scene breaks that alternate between character perspectives. Personally, I enjoyed the many scene breaks, as it makes it convenient for taking breaks or stopping for the day.

Characters

The other week, I submitted a short story for an online Publishing company called Havok. The submission had what was called Dynamic Duos, or two characters that interact with each other (e.g. Frodo and Sam).

The two protagonists in the Phoenix Unchained strongly share this trait. One is soft-spoken and thin, the other is hot-tempered and burly. I enjoyed the character interactions and especially the dialog; it left me amused and satisfied, as any good cast should.

Magic System

The magic in the Phoenix Unchained initially comes off as generic and uninteresting. However, I was amazed at how the authors cleverly wove it into the character development for one of the protagonists. It even plays a part in the antagonist’s arc. The lore behind the magic system is deep and left me interested.

Conflict

The tension is a rollercoaster of stressful encounters to peaceful resolutions, as I expected in any fantasy thriller. What caught me by surprise was the death of a main character halfway through the book.

The monsters and demons are portrayed excellently, some at a Stephen King-grade level that left me shaken and worried for the protagonists.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

The Phoenix Unchained is a great read for fantasy buffs with its rich amount of lore, tension, amusing characters, and clever magic system.

The Bad

Despite its enjoyable dialog and immersive environment, several prose errors caught me off balance. At other times, I felt like I was reading a manuscript that wasn’t well edited. It wasn’t so much as finding a typo as it was the excessive amount of adverbs used. The POV also wasn’t as detailed as it could as been, leaving some distance between reader and character.

That said, the prose concision was poor, lacking a fine polish that you may find in another fantasy novel.

The Ugly

There is a lot of travel involved in the plot. The authors failed to include a map that would have been helpful as I read through the story. There was also no chapter index—but that’s a minor nitpick.

—My Rating for The Phoenix Unchained: 4/5 stars—

This is a solid book for anyone interested in fantasy. As long as you don’t mind lacking a world map and the plethora of adverbs—and prose concision for that matter—, then you should enjoy the story. The characters will entertain you and some scenes will leave you at the edge of your seat.

I may do another review when I get through the second book.


Thanks again for reading. Remember to hit that “follow” button below. I really appreciate the likes and comments you leave below. Cheers.

 

 

Book Review: Bridge of Birds

 

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Welcome, my readers, to another book review. This time I went for a more exotic pick, delving into Asian mythos. I figured this would help me write Tempest of the Dragon since both stories are based in East Asia.

—Bridge of Birds—

Premise

The story of Bridge of Birds is set in ancient China. The themes presented in the book include adventure, humor, and fantasy. Many of the Chinese mythoi are fascinating, and the author did a superb job weaving them into the plot.

The main character, Number Ten Ox, leaves his village to discover a cure for a disease afflicting his village. During his journey, he encounters a host of bizarre and unusual enemies throughout ancient China. Surviving assassins, ghosts, sultry concubines, and immortal dukes, Ox and his partner unearth the legacy of a fallen goddess and how to save her from damnation.

Length

The book is around 280 pages and chapters are straightforward and short; although I would have appreciated a table of contents to guide me through it. Oh well.

Characters

The characters in the story are amusing and oftentimes comical. Number Ten Ox is a youth built for strength and not so much for wits.

His adventuring partner, Master Li, is the opposite: an experienced old man with a “slight flaw in his character”. He comes off as a wizened individual who is both wise yet daring.

The side characters make brief appearances throughout the story, adding amusement in creative ways. There are a few gruesome scenes and deaths among the characters, but the overall story remains jovial.

Magic System

Bridge of Birds makes full use of Chinese mythology with its inclusion of ghosts, alchemy, ancient medicine, and other Taoist concepts like immortality. The magic system may appeal more to historical fiction buffs than fantasy fans.

Romance

The romance in the story is undeveloped and shallow, as the protagonist often jumps from one partner to the next. However, the author often incorporates elements of comedy into these engagements and I never took each romance scene too seriously.

Conflict

The tension in the story is present but lacking, offset by myraid comedy relief that lightens the story. At first, many of the obstacles faced by the protagonist seem dire, but a creative or amusing solution always result a page or two later.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Bridge of Birds has excellent comedy relief with a sense of whimsical adventure that grabs the reader. Its good balance of themes makes each chapter a fulfilling read. The characters are engaging and fit their roles well.

The Bad

The prose construction was sloppy in several areas, leading to verbose paragraphs and a dearth of descriptions in others. The protagonist’s emotions were not well internalized, as the story was told from a third-person distant narrative.

The Ugly

A few scenes had graphic detail, which was surprising for a book that wavers between jovial themes and gruesome concepts so readily.

—My rating for Bridge of Birds: 4/5 stars: a decent read—

Bridge of Birds is a pleasant book, with its lighthearted spin on a fantasy adventure. It is very entertaining with its cast of characters, themes, decent pacing, and East Asian mythology.

Parts of the story were weak from a dearth of descriptions, emotions, or character development, but the ending was very satisfying and worthwhile.

A reader looking for an amusing fantasy novel that isn’t too serious should enjoy this story.

 


Thank you again for reading and remember to hit that “follow” button below. Enjoy the fall weather! 🙂

 

 

Book Review: The Law of One

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Hello again, my faithful readers and fans. I decided to continue with the nonfiction book reviews, specifically another conspiracy, and spiritual book. This series is called The Law of One: The Ra Material. Like with Edgar Cayce, this book is filled with curious information that many would consider being fictitious or speculative. Without further ado, let’s dig in! 😛

—The Law of One—

Premise

The Law of One is filled with curious information of a philosophical nature. Topics covered include spirituality, diet, historical events, ancient architecture, and more. Much of the book is in interview format between the questioner and a being named Ra.

It gets a bit freaky when you learn that this Ra speaks through someone else, like a form of possession. This evokes feelings of both suspense, wonder, and apprehension.

Prose

The wording is relatively straightforward, but some of Ra’s answers span several paragraphs, and those can be difficult to understand. You may need to reread a section a few times to grasp it fully.

Length

The book is fairly short at around 200 pages. Interview sessions serve as chapters and can be anywhere from a page to several pages long. There are five installations in this series, each packed with esoteric messages.

Information

The information provided in this book is speculative and deep. Some of the sessions are fascinating, while others are ponderous and hard to understand. I recommend rereading the book at least a few times to fully understand what the book is trying to tell the reader.

The majority of the knowledge contained in this novel is inspiring and it expands the mind. Ra stresses virtue and moments of inner silence so that humanity may grow as spiritual beings.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

The Law of One offers some inspirational wisdom within its pages. Anyone who has studied spirituality and religion will respect what Ra offers. The books are relatively short and shouldn’t take too long to read. After finishing, these books serve as excellent reference guides on spirituality.

The Bad

Parts of the book are so deep that they are hard to comprehend for most people. One should reread the series at least twice to grasp the esoteric messages.

The Ugly

This book conveys some arcane information that readers may find disturbing or revelatory. Reader discretion is advised as this is a very subjective book.

 

—My rating for The Law of One: 4/5 stars: — an excellent, if outlandish read

The Law of One is a fascinating read for those with an open mind and a background in spirituality. It provides some helpful advice that the reader can apply in their own life. The book is also short, despite its ponderous paragraphs and wild information. Each read-through may unravel new information to the reader.

At worst, the Law of One is excellent science fiction; at best, it’s an instruction booklet on how to steer one’s life through the myriad issues that trouble humanity. All in all that makes it a worthwhile read.


Are you a Law of One fan who has researched the series? What did you think of it? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


A reminder: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry is now available! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White. The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite impressive.

You can view and buy other books from ZPublishing too. Any purchases made through the above link benefit this blog. Thanks a lot. 🙂

 

Book Review: Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet

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Greetings, my readers. I decided to switch things up a bit and review a nonfiction novel. This installation is Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn. It’s a fascinating read and covers a variety of information that should appeal to a broad audience. Anyway, on with the show!

—Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet—

Premise

Edgar Cayce was an unnatural man, the book claimed, with his ability to enter a trance and procure insightful information. Upon waking, Cayce wouldn’t remember any of it, but listeners would jot down his words.

Many sick people were cured after following Cayce’s directions—and he often supplied complex or unusual ingredients for each cure. Cayce’s work also mentioned reincarnation and theories of Atlantis, delving deep into conspiracy theory and spiritual suggestion.

Prose

Unfortunately, the writing fluctuated between exciting and dull. If you don’t know what to look for, reading this book for the first time may seem overwhelming.

Much of the book is organized into case studies where a patient comes to Cayce for a diagnosis. Cayce provides a curse for a particular disease and elaborates on why it occurred. Some of these studies were intriguing.

Length

Chapters are relatively long, and the book runs around three-hundred pages in a fine print.

Information

The ideas in this book may come off as far-fetched to some readers—but in general, Cayce had some wise advice, particularly with health and spiritual outlook. The many people cured through Cayce are scientifically documented, suggesting there is a method to his madness.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet has an abundant amount of detail across a wide variety of topics. Any open-minded reader would value the wisdom within this novel, able to apply it to his or her own life.

The case studies are straight forward and enjoyable, ranging from cancer patients to migraine victims and paralysis. Cayce also mentions topics like Atlantis, geological upheaval of the planet, and spiritual concepts. Stearn did an excellent job portraying Cayce’s information.

The Bad

This novel isn’t for everyone and requires an open mind. The prose can be difficult to understand sometimes, and you can easily get overwhelmed in all the information. As an aid, I highlighted specific portions of the book that I could reference later.

The Ugly

This book was written in the mid-twentieth century, so some of the information may be outdated or obsolete.

—My rating for Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet: 4/5 stars: an excellent read—

Jess Stearn produced a fantastic book on the mystic, Edgar Cayce. For me, several of the topics hit home, and I found most of the book very enjoyable and informative. Much of what Cayce suggested can still be applied today, empowering readers’ lives with his cryptic words.

As I mentioned above, parts of the book are dry and serve as filler content. It is highly recommended that you underline or highlight specific passages and later—after finishing the book—use it as a reference guide.

Overall, if you’re an open-minded reader with an interest in alternative medicine and new age theories, then this book is for you.


Have you any thoughts on Edgar Cayce? Are you a Cayce fan who has researched his work? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


Bonus: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry will be available starting this Monday the 29th! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White.

The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite beautiful to read. I get a portion of any profits, so if you’d like to support me, I’d really appreciate it! 🙂