Writing and Creating Through the Inner Intelligence

This week let’s discuss our Inner Intelligence. What is this mysterious force within us, you might ask? How can we access or come to understand it? More importantly, there are ways to channel this power into creative outlets, like writing or artwork.

It’s the spark that invigorates us and drives us forward to complete the impossible. It’s the force that keeps our spirits high, even when we get discouraged.

Even when everyone else cuts us down.

Call it God, Allah, Buddha, Mother Nature, the human brain, or whatever you will. It is that intelligent spark that gives rise to ideas.

To innovation.

When we surrender to it completely, there’s no telling where it might lead.

Looking Inward

How do we know for sure that this Intelligence exists? We feel it whenever we are out in nature. When we enjoy our favorite pastime, engrossing ourselves in the joy of the moment. It drives us forward, gives us a reason to live, to aspire to new heights.

It makes us human.

As Writer’s Perspective

As writers, builders of worlds, we’ve certainly faltered in our quest. There have been episodes of fear, self-doubt, and sloth. It’s not easy creating a manuscript, but looking at it after years of work, it becomes something magnificent.

We can attribute this success to the divine Intelligence within us. Sometimes, this Intelligence is a playful muse, other times it is a taskmaster. Still, it leads to one goal.

Creation.

When we funnel this infinite Intelligence through our bodies, there’s no limit, no mountain that is too difficult to surmount. Our creative juices run wild, forming vivid worlds and paintings. For others, it fuels our energy throughout the day helping us to do menial tasks at work.

When we ground ourselves in stillness, we draw inward and banish the noise of the outer world. In this fashion, we move to our inner universe.

Studies Done on Meditation

American scientists held a study that examined what’s coined the Meditation Effect. Similar to going on a relaxing vacation, the research showed changed gene expression in those who participated. Long-term effects suggested a reduction in stress or age-related genes.

Another study by Harvard held an eight-week practice of mindfulness meditation. Participants showed an increased tendency towards memory, empathy, and patience. Scans showed the ritual changed the gray matter in the brain.

A second study at Harvard suggested meditation could improve ailments, particularly digestive disorders. This practice slows breathing, thereby regulating oxygen intake, blood pressure, and heart rate.

Methods of Funneling the Inner Intelligence into Writing

There are many ways we can awaken this divine Intelligence. Some of the best ways are:

  1. Relax – Let go of your ego’s blathering. Drink deep the chalice of stillness and mindfulness. Fight against the urge to think about anything, even your story. Regulate your breathing or chant mantras to redirect your concentration. There are dozens of ways to implement meditation.
  2. Time – Between writing, reading, family obligations, and a day job, it’s especially challenging to find the time to meditate. Our busy society discourages this–yet, without time to rejuvenate the subconscious, burnout is inevitable. Block out part of your day dedicated to meditating, even if it’s only 5 minutes a day. Your subliminal brain will thank you. Some people meditate better at night when the rest of the world sleeps, others in the morning. Find an ideal time that works for you.
  3. Space – Establish a quiet area where you won’t be disturbed. Be sure it’s comfortable and dark. If you need to, ask your living mates to not enter for a designated interval. Defend this personal space from any miscellaneous disruptions, if possible.
  4. Dedication – Meditation, like writing, doesn’t come quickly. With your routine established, stick to it. Some days may feel unproductive, while others will. Work your way up to 20 or even 60 minutes a day if possible.
  5. Tools – Implements like music, essential oil fragrance, or colors can enhance meditation. Everyone is different; experiment, and find what works best.
  6. Write After Meditation – The brain enters a different state after prolonged relaxation. During this period, creativity and productivity may be at its highest. Take advantage of this episode to work on your piece or jot down notes. Many legendary writers such as Shakespeare utilized this to produce their masterpieces.

The Ethereal Sealsi series makes heavy use of meditation with its magic system, called Shifting. Meditation helps characters channel the ether through their spines. Each Shifter can only draw so much ether into their bodies before it burns out the spine.

Divine Inspiration

India makes heavy use of meditation in their culture. The Kundalini energy in Hinduism is a serpent-like force that climbs up the spine as a practitioner advances. Kundalini adepts often report painful heat in the spine, among other things.

In Blade of Dragons, this is similar with how Pepper Slyhart inherits the Dragonsoul from her mother. The Dragonsoul is both a curse and a boon for the hero, and it forms a big part of her arc.

Before starting the series, the Intelligence within spelled out what the objectives of the stories would be. They were to:

  • Create an immersive, fantasy world to fascinate readers
  • Encourage interest in practices like meditation
  • Introduce concepts that might encourage this Intelligence in others

This two-fold approach was risky. Looking over the manuscript now, it reads more organic and complete than initially thought.

Concluding Thoughts

As the story nears its date of publication, whether in a few months or a year from now, it will carry an important message for all of us:

That divine Intelligence within is waiting.

All we must do is observe it and listen to its words. It is a voice that will never steer us wrong, as long as the ego is quiet, and peace is within us.


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Meditation, Stillness, Creativity: an artist’s revelation.

backlit beach clouds dark

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

—Meditation and Creativity—

I’ve practiced meditation for several years now. I find it to be a calming, insightful practice that stimulates creativity and it has helped with my writing and digital artwork. For more information on the practice, see this older article I wrote.

That said, I had a revelation about it quite recently that I feel is important to anyone reading this—be they a writer, artist, meditator, or an average joe.

When we ground ourselves in stillness, we draw inward and banish the noise of the outer world. In this fashion, we move to our inner universe. It’s here that nothing from the outside should penetrate this sacred place—ideally anyway.

—My Background with Meditation—

During the past few weeks, months, maybe even years—I’ve forgotten how long—my allowance for outside noise gradually increased outside my notice. It became so bad that I couldn’t focus, too anxious thinking about my projects and work. Even my sleep got messed up. I didn’t create that special place of rest and healing that I so desperately needed.

My point is when we do something like meditation or any other healing or resting ritual, we sometimes become forgetful of what that inner universe is really like. I feel so blessed to have reawakened to this notation—and I pray that, to anyone reading this, that you, too, treasure and respect your inner self.

Meditation is so beneficial to the body, but we can’t just sit down and force it to happen; it’s a natural, passive process that takes us on a journey inward.

—Tips on Practicing—

Here are some tips and methods to begin this practice, if you feel so inclined:

  1. Relax – Let go of whatever your ego wants you to think. Drink deep the chalice of stillness and mindfulness. Fight against the urge to think about anything, even your story. Regulate your breathing or chant mantras to redirect your concentration. There are dozens of ways to implement meditation.
  2. Time – Between writing, reading, family obligations, and a day job, it’s especially challenging to find the time to meditate. Our busy society discourages this–yet, without time to rejuvenate the subconscious, burnout is inevitable. Block out part of your day dedicated to meditating, even if it’s only 5 minutes a day. Your subliminal brain will thank you. Some people meditate better at night when the rest of the world sleeps, others in the morning. Find an ideal time that works for you.
  3. Space – Establish a quiet area where you won’t be disturbed. Be sure it’s comfortable and dark. If you need to, ask your living mates to not enter for a designated interval. Defend this personal space from any miscellaneous disruptions, if possible.
  4. Dedication – Meditation, like writing, doesn’t come quickly. With your routine established, stick to it. Some days may feel unproductive, while others will. Work your way up to 20 or even 60 minutes a day if possible.
  5. Tools – Implements like music, essential oil fragrance, or colors can enhance meditation. Everyone is different; experiment, and find what works best.
  6. Write After Meditation – The brain enters a different state after prolonged relaxation. During this period, creativity and productivity may be at its highest. Take advantage of this episode to work on your piece or jot down notes. Many legendary writers such as Shakespeare utilized this to produce their masterpieces.

—Some Additional Insight—

In ancient India texts, the act of writing corresponds to the fifth chakra Visudda, also known as the throat chakra. Your throat has a compact bundle of nerves at the neck. These contribute to the acceptance and expression of originality of voice. The main obstacle of the fifth chakra—which most writers struggle with—is doubt and negativity. Through meditation, confidence is restored, and the nerves purify.

The fifth chakra works with the second one at the navel, called Svadhisthana, or the sacral chakra.  This energy center controls pleasure and creativity. When the body isn’t producing sexual energy for biological reproduction, the life force goes towards the abstract, or creative ideas. Blockages in this chakra result in creative stagnation or exhaustion. Through meditation, the nerve endings restore their creative-inspiring state.

—A Spiritual Conclusion—

This is but a fragment of the information out there. Feel free to investigate the source links below. Writing bears an imprint of our soul, one that we transmute from the abstract (spirit) to the concrete (words). The physical and astral unavoidably connect, and neglecting one over the other cannot work for success.

Thank you for reading and I’ll leave you with this quote:

“He doth entreat your grace, my noble lord,
To visit him to-morrow or next day:
He is within, with two right reverend fathers,
Divinely bent to meditation,
And in no worldly suits would he be moved
To draw him from his holy exercise.”

William Shakespeare
The Tragedy of King Richard the Third